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Old 02-Jul-2003, 01:31 PM
Whele Whele is offline
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Rear Ride Height Tool

I Got some details yesterday (at Mallory) about a supplier of the ride height tool from a company called K-Tech. However, I cant find any web address or details etc.

also

Why the need for the tool, can a ruler not be used to measure from centre of rear wheel to centre of rear sub frame directly above the wheel?

I realise i would not give the same reading as the ride height tool but could this measurement be used as a reference measuremnt when increasing the height?

The spec ride height is 243 to 245. Mine is only 220. I would like to increase it 5mm at a time until I am happy. Especially since i am running the steeper head angle - I dont want it to become too flighty at the front.

Any help on the subject apreciated
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Old 02-Jul-2003, 02:20 PM
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DSC Region Organiser skidlids skidlids is offline
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whele, yes you can use a measurement between your subframe and wheel spindle centre. Or better still get a boss made to fit the wheel like I did it has a outside diameter of 40mm so I know for the centre reading I have to add 20mm, you can even use the bearing housing on the Paddock stand, in my case thats 52mm OD so 26mm to the centre, you only realy need the centre measurements if using a ride height tool, which I do use for racing when using different sprockets for different tracks., otherwise a measurement between the top of the bearing housing to your subframe should allow you to make adjustments, but these measurements will only truely apply to your bike.
if you want some comparisons between centre spindle & ride height tool compared to centre of spindle and subframe you could search the old notice board as I posted the info there a few months ago. Search by Skidlids or ride height.
Kev
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Old 02-Jul-2003, 02:55 PM
Felix Felix is offline
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If you are mainly using it for your own reference, you don't need the tool. Your suggestion with a ruler works just fine.

The tool is a must for teams setting up multiple bikes as they need a more repeatable reference from bike to bike.

Also, if you use the ruler method, you can always "calibrate" your ruler next time you find someone with the factory tool. After that, it's just like using the tool.
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Old 02-Jul-2003, 06:08 PM
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Jasper Jasper is offline
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I can supply a drawing or pattern of the ride height tool?How many times have i posted that?
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Old 03-Jul-2003, 02:11 AM
neil748r neil748r is offline
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Whele, K-Tech's number is 01530 810 625. JHP also make the tool, a perfect laser cut reproduction of factory part. That's where I got mine, cost a good few quid but worth every penny for the accuracy alone.

All the ride height spec from Ducati is based on specific datum point on the tool to the axle centre. If you don't have the tool, how have you established that your ride height is 220mm?
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Old 03-Jul-2003, 10:14 AM
Whele Whele is offline
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neil - I borrowed a tool and checked the ride height, then had to return it. This was a couple of days ago. So I now know that my ride height is a little low as 240 to 245 is the recommended spec.

I theorised that I know that I need to raise the ride height by 20mm, perhaps in 5mm or 10mm increments.

Also, when I change gearing the chain adjuster alters the ride height so I also would like to be able to compensate.

I did some experiments last evening, Throuble is, that to get an accurate measure onto the rear subframe from the wheel centre means that I had to take off the right hand tail pipe, no big deal....but lots of ****ing about at a race meet when added to the time taken to change gearing.

Guess I'll go the proper tool route to save time in the long run.

Tried undoing the ride height adjuster bar last night. Dammn tight, left hand thread too, couldn't shift it at all.
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Old 03-Jul-2003, 03:13 PM
neil748r neil748r is offline
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That explains where you got 220mm from then! I don't think most people realise that even adjusting your chain alters ride height. That's where I find the tool comes into its own and from the sound of it, I think you're going to have to bite the bullet and get one.

Got some "base settings" from JHP recently. Assuming it's Showa front, four rings showing above top yoke and static sag of 22-25mm. At the rear, 246mm ride height and static sag of 8-10mm. Adjust comp and rebound (front and back) to suit yourself. Also, try to get the axle centre at approx 5 o'clock in relation to the eccentric centre (if that makes sense) when looking from the sprocket side. That's how I'm running at the moment and I gotta say, it's not bad at all! I had the same problem when I tried to loosen the tie bar lock nuts for the first time. They were a total bas***d to undo and even heat and a vice wouldn't shift them (loctited at the factory) so I ended up cutting them off (super soft aluminium) and buying new ones, only a couple of quid each. Used molybdenum disulphide grease on the new ones and now they loosen off no prob when needs be.

If you're speaking to K-Tech, ask about having your forks and shock reworked. I know someone thats had it done and the difference is amazing! I guess that's why almost the entire BSB paddock have K-Tech modded suspension! Cost about 700 but that's a lot less than even the cheapest Ohlins forks and it's both ends of the bike!
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Old 03-Jul-2003, 04:05 PM
Whele Whele is offline
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I do already have Ohlins at both ends of the bike courtesy of it being an SPS, I have rebuilt the forks recently new oil and seals etc.

What I'm searching for is (the golden nirvana) a setup that turns in very quick without the front end being Skippy on the power. I have tried the steeper head angle, which I actually rather like, but to keep it tame I have to wind up the steering damper up a lot, which then defeats some of the gains.
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Old 03-Jul-2003, 04:12 PM
DJ Tera DJ Tera is offline
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Get some 10-spoke mags mate at 100MPH you can get it on its side and back upright again in a second

Shame it was too wet to try it at mallory :P
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Old 03-Jul-2003, 04:14 PM
neil748r neil748r is offline
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When i got the info from JHP, I asked about the steeper head angle. They never use it apparantly and find that the settings i gave before has the bike droping into turns very quickly and easily without the "loose front" feeling. If it still wasn't fast enough, they just advised to go up a little more on ride height. Maybe worth a try?
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