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Old 24-May-2006, 10:39 AM
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998 Vibration - (Numb fingers solution)

Is it me or mine?
I'm getting dead hands after riding 60-100 miles on my Ducati 998S.

Handle bar weights or something required....
Anyone else have this?

It's about to get booked in for its first major service, I think I'll try the guys down in Hampshire (albeit I live near Heathrow).

And remember if it flys, floats or f*cks, then lease it.
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Old 24-May-2006, 01:33 PM
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I would say that you need to relax - gripping the handlebars too tightly will cause this!!!!

:P
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Old 26-May-2006, 12:13 AM
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I may be new to Duke's, but I've been riding since I was 4!!
Upgraded my 175 Yamaha to a Bull 350 when I was 11, then a Kawaka 750 2-stroke triple...this was not fun around the farm!!
210MPH impact accident at 17, head on on a dual carriage way!
Ninja v K100, both lost.

Over 250K miles on bikes
I love the duke, but it aint a mid life crisis causing me to "hang on".

Any more "advice"?

Cheers

Paul
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Old 26-May-2006, 06:22 AM
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If you've been riding since you were 4 and done over 250k miles then you need new hands. The recommended replacement period is 50 years or 200k miles, whichever comes first.

Dukes are a lot more vibey than any other bikes I've had. Do you have access to another one to compare whether yours is better/worse than normal?

If your is the same or less vibey then bar-end weights should help or liquid snake (www.barsnake.com).

If yours is more vibey than normal then call Nelly at Cornerspeed!
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Old 26-May-2006, 07:16 AM
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"210MPH impact accident at 17, head on on a dual carriage way"

maybe its just psychological - IN YOUR HEAD!!!!

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Old 26-May-2006, 08:42 PM
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Grrrrrr

ONC, HNC, CIM, Dip M, MBA....and these are just the words I can say!!!
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Old 27-May-2006, 12:36 AM
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My 998 Hybrid has a lot of vibration creep in at certain revs, I'm hoping that once I get around to fitting the Power Commander I can dial most of it out as it feels to me as if the engine is fighting itself at certain engine speeds.
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Old 27-May-2006, 05:38 AM
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Numb Fingers Solution

Numb fingers when riding a motorcycle is a common problem. The fact of the matter is that when you apply engine vibration to the nerves in your hand, the nerves go tingly and fall asleep. The amount of vibration and frequency is different for different motorcycles and at different speeds.

Keep in mind that the position of your body on the bike affects the overall weight distribution. Sportbikes are designed specifically to have a more forward riding position to place the center of your body weight lower and further forward, to better balance the bike and improve handling. But certainly for street riding it isn't the most comfortable position and the heads-down orientation isnít the safest.

The weight of your upper body transmitted through your hands to the grips causes compression of the palmer cutaneous branch of the median nerve. This nerve compression temporarily impedes peripheral nerve conduction, causing numbness. Further, the more weight you put on the grips the better the transfer of the vibration to your hands.

I installed Helibars on a 916 mainly to provide a more comfortable upright sitting position and to take some of the weight off my hands that helped solve a problem with numb fingers.

However, after making this change I have mixed feelings about the new riding position. I prefer the factory handlebar position for more aggressive riding, but I like the more comfortable neck position and posture with the Helibars. Further, during certain riding conditions the angle of the bars just donít feel right to me.

If I was to do it again, Iíd buy bar risers with some range of adjustment. The Helibars can be slid down the forks and rotated front-to-back but they always keep their less-extreme tip-down bar angle. Iíd recommend instead a riser bar similar to that sold by Cycle Cat that are quite a bit more adjustable (but quite a bit more expensive.)

Also, they allow you to switch back to a better position for track days.

For street riding and touring, bar risers wonít change the handling enough to be concerned about. Most of us would rather have a bike that handles slightly different than stock, but tailored to allow you to ride longer and sharper without physical fatigue (fatigue being a HUGE enemy of handling), rather than a bike that folds you into a full-race position meant for the track.

There's a couple of more things you can do.

Try foam grips ($5 grips from a bicycle shop work very well). You can lessen vibration by isolating yourself and/or the bars from the vibration source by positioning a cushion (low frequency spring) along the path of vibration (foam between your hands and the bars) and/or use something to isolate the bars (i.e. rubber mounts) from the rest of the bike at high frequencies. You can also try riding gloves with thicker leather or gel padding on the palms.

Add weight to the handlebars - at the ends - LOTS of it (sorry, Alex.) The handlebar is actually responding to the engine's vibrations and will vibrate in harmony (resonate) at certain engine RPM. You can change the resonant frequency of the handlebars so that the bars do not respond to the engine vibration at say cruising speeds (shorter stiffer bars will tend to cause the high amplitude vibration to shift to higher speeds, longer or weighted bars will tend to cause high amplitude vibration to shift to lower speeds). Some manufacturers include weighted bar-ends as part of the design.

Weighted bar-ends are added mass that will lower the resonant frequency of the bar so it vibrates less strongly but does not eliminate all vibration. In many cases, that's enough. You simply change the resonance to a frequency that the bike rarely generates or to a RPM that has less effect on the nerves in your hand. Shifting the resonant frequency is intended to reduce the strength (amplitude) of the vibration at your normal cruising RPM.

I went to a dive shop and paid $3.00 for a 3 lb. lead belt weight (wheel balance weights and lead fishing weights mixed with epoxy would work too), cut it up, hammered it into shape and shoved/wedged it in the handlebar. Itís got to be in there tight to work, closer to the free-end works best. The lead piece in each of my handle bars is about 5 in X 1/2 in.

After adding foam grips, handlebar lead and Helibars, the numbness stopped for me altogether. Before these changes, my throttle hand would go to sleep to the point I was afraid that I wouldn't be able to use my front brake in an emergency.

So, start with the foam grips and then the lead weights. In the meantime, while riding, get rid of the numbness more quickly by momentarily tapping your fingertips hard against your thigh to get the feeling back.
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Old 30-May-2006, 04:14 PM
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I do also suffer from this complaint too, was thinking what a good idea the bar snake was ?? Any one used them and which one would i need for my 748r
thanks
Jamie
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Old 26-Nov-2006, 06:34 PM
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I've now loaded up the bars with weights, about 5oz a side, which has improved things, however I was thinking of "sponge" grips next, like we used to fit in the 80's.

I tried not holding on to the bars so tightly, but when I opened her up, it felt like two bouncers where trying to pull me off the back of the bike, so I had to hold on tight again ;-)
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