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Old 08-Feb-2004, 12:47 AM
Ericsson Ericsson is offline
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Belt Tension Tool

Hi all!
I'm new to this board, and it seems there are a lot of people with 748R:s here. I own a 2002 748R myself which I'm really happy with (that's until I find out how many rockers are shot ;-)

Anyway, my question is: Does anyone know who manufacture / sell the belt tension tool. I'm absolutely not sure, but I think it's made in the UK and it might be used with Ford Fiestas. The part # could be 21-113. A lot of might and could, but does anyone know for sure?


Here's a picture from CA-Cycleworks US


[Edited on 7-2-2004 by Ericsson]

[Edited on 8-2-2004 by Ericsson]
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Old 08-Feb-2004, 02:49 AM
neil748r neil748r is offline
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Hi and welcome aboard!

The tool is made by SPX Lowener. Not sure of the part number. Follow this link for contact details: http://www.spxeurope.com/English/MainEN.htm

Cheers,

Neil
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Old 08-Feb-2004, 09:58 AM
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DSC Region Organiser skidlids skidlids is offline
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I use a snap-on tensioning tool http://premiertools.co.uk/cat916_1.htm

and a little while ago I posted info on a similar tool from Facom

old thread http://ducatisportingclub.com/contro...d.php?tid=3807
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Old 08-Feb-2004, 02:04 PM
neil748r neil748r is offline
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Sorry, forgot to mention, the SPX Lowener belt tension gauge is the one as supplied to Ducati. In other words, it's the right tool for the job!

I'm sure that other tools will do the job just as well but whichever one you go for, make sure that it is graduated in "Lowener" units. All the belt tension figures supplied by Ducati in their workshop manuals are in "Loweners".

Cheers,

Neil
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Old 08-Feb-2004, 03:56 PM
Ericsson Ericsson is offline
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Thanks for the great information Neil and Skidlid. :thumbsup

I've sent an email to SPX Loewener about the tool so I hope I'll get info on price and availability soon.

I didn't know there were other tension tools available, but with Skidlids info and a search on the board shows there are quite a few:
- Snap-on ??
- Facom DM.16
- AST 4395
- Clavis (expensive? easy to check 98Hz though)

The AST is interesting, is that using the Loewener scale?
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Old 08-Feb-2004, 04:46 PM
neil748r neil748r is offline
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Glad to be of help mate, that's the beauty of the DSC!

If you hear back from SPX, perhaps you could post the prices and availability of the tool on hear? I'm sure there will be plenty of other DSC people interested in knowing.

Cheers,

Neil
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Old 08-Feb-2004, 07:10 PM
Pitcrew Pitcrew is offline
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Hi guys, call me an old fool if you wish, but I've used the 5mm Allen key manual method on Dukes I've had and had no problems at all. I question why some of you guys go to the expense of some of these special tools instead of using others experience. Here are a few comments from other sites about tensioning manually. Make your own mind up of course but if you tension by 5mm do it cold, not hot.

California Cycleworks has the tool for $300.same as factory tool but much better price.
I purchased a gauge from Chris Kelly, Ca-cycleworks.com. After doing it several times I can do it closely enough without the gauge. One indicator is to twist the belt(on the longest span of the belt between pulleys)45 degrees with only finger strength. (45degrees, not 90 degrees as is common for autos).

The hex key trick will work on a 4v, only you measure in a different place. Across the top of the belt, at the top of the head, between both cam sprockets, scribe a line where the belt sits. Then, using moderate pressure, take a 5mm key and push down. If you can get the top of the hex below the line you scribed, it is set good. Granted, it's not as accurate, but it is good for checking every now and then, and will even work if you don't have the $300 to pony up.

Another method is between the cam pulleys, with moderate pressure, push up in the center of the belt to the underside lip of the backing plate.

The last 2 responses work the best and you dont have to spend $300 on a tension tool that doesnt work worth a crap!

If you loosen the pulley nuts and apply light finger pressure to it while tightening it up you'll be just about right and be able to then slip a 5mm wrench in the gap. The tension on the factory spring tool is about 10 ft. lbs if I remember correctly from the Haynes manual. I use a digital fish scale too - and pull to 10 ft lbs then tighten the screws - magically the 5mm wrench slips in the gap when done. AND the old timer method of twisting the belt to 45 degrees with little (no) effort is a triple check on the work. I always use two or three methods as described above to make sure I'm not too tight on the belts.

I too was perplexed by this! Very unscientific but quite workable. Hold the 5 mm (long) key by the end and push against the belt with moderate pressure so the key won’t twist out of your hand. The key should just make the fixed roller turn from the dragging. When in doubt go looser. I have logged more than 30,000 miles using this method with no trouble. With new belts go back and recheck after 6-800 miles, they will be loose again but settle in from that point.

Check out this site for maintenance with pictures. http://www.ducatisuite.com/belttension
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Old 08-Feb-2004, 07:49 PM
Ericsson Ericsson is offline
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Hi Pitcrew,
Well, I'm trying to avoid spending +$300USD on an gauge, therefore I'm trying to find other sources.

The problem is that most of the info applies to the two-valves and the info on the 4-valves is much vaguer with a bit of thumb pressure here and moderate pressure there and 3 mm instead of 5mm.

Granted, with time and experience I might also go without a gauge and do it with "feel" but when I go 11000rpm on the long straight I'd like to know it's set right.

Cheers,
/Uffe
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Old 09-Feb-2004, 12:17 AM
Mike Davis Mike Davis is offline
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Firstly this 5mm with moderate pressure that I keep hearing about, if my missus puts moderate pressure on a belt its going to be a lot less than 18 stone rugby playing Joe, so theres no real base to work from there.

However I do agree that people that have done it several times get a "feel for it" and while there is no problem with belts slipping or breaking and doing the mileage, the other thing that is overlooked is if the tension of the belt is out, only by a small amount, the cam timings are also out.

I have watched John Hacket prove this very theory on a Dyno by getting upwards of 6 BHP just by correctly tensioning the belts.

My ten peneth for what its worth.

Happy belt tensioning.
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