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Old 29-Sep-2011, 11:12 AM
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Bionicle Bionicle is offline
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1965 Ducati 350SC

Do you have a spare 27,500-32,500 lying around ?

Racing versions of the Ducati Mach 1 appeared during 1965, the Mach 1/S and the more exotic 250 and 350 Sport Corsa. The SC was a completely different machine to the Mach 1/S which was a race version of the road motorcycle. The SC, like the earlier Ducati F3 was a hand-built racing machine that shared very little with the production 250. The engine included sand-cast crankcases designed to accommodate the double cradle frame. The cylinder head was the sand-cast 250 F3 type with shorter camshafts than the Mach 1. Valve sizes were 40 and 36mm. There was also a close ratio five-speed gearbox which is unique to the SC, with wider gears and longer shafts. Each SC came with individual wiring diagrams and magneto ignition was optional. The carburetion for the 1965 was by Dell'Orto, an SS1 30 on the 250 and an SS1 32B on the 350. Apart from the double cradle frame with wider engine mounts that was specific to the SC, there were also special alloy Marzocchi forks with stepped folk tubes. The wheels were 19 inch front and rear and for 1965 the brakes were Grimeca. Only around twenty 250SCs and six 350SC were built during 1965 and for 1966 there were some developments. The 250SC received a different carburetor and both models were fitted with Oldani brakes front and rear. There was a fiberglass fuel tank and humpback solo seat but the frame and running gear was unchanged. The 250 and 350SC were extremely purposeful machines but did not realize their full potential. Although not well documented, today they stand out as some of the most desirable Ducatis of the 1960s.

One of the rarest Ducati's ever, this 350SC is believed to be one of only six series 2 350 SC motorcycles the factory ever built, originally built for the Barcelona endurance races. This particular bike's covered no miles since it was rebuilt some years ago by the very well known and respected British Ducati race engine builder Anthony Ainsley using new factory parts. There is a spares and tool kit with the bike which includes a new factory special double web race rod set, good second hand piston, special factory tools, information pack, and other parts. Other details include original factory supplied alloy tank and fairing, Veglia competition rev counter, checked and x-ray'd original Oldani magnesium brakes, 32mm SS1 Del Orto carb and original rims with stainless spokes. This Ducati was brought into the United Kingdom after many years of being in South Africa where Ducati had sent it along with Franco Farne' to promote the brand down there in the late 1960's. Moto Marianna has checked the engine over thoroughly and can confirm it's in as new condition. When new these engines were unbreakable which was proved by London dealer, Vic Camp holding one at maximum revs for a long period of time to check its strength! They had very sophisticated test methods in the 60's! Suffice to say, it did not destruct. This motorcycle was designed for endurance races, not for short circuit races but it would be accepted for a place in both Goodwood events as well as the CRMC and IHRO series of classic motorcycle races across Europe.


http://www.historics.co.uk/buying/on...ati-350sc.aspx

Or how about a Ducati 175 Super Sport 6,500-9,500

The Ducati Gran Sport, particularly in the 100 and 125cc versions, were incredibly successful between 1955 and 1958 and even after it was replaced by the Ducati F3, many riders in Italy continued to campaign the Gran Sport. The success of the Gran Sport was such that Fabio Taglioni was allowed to adapt his advanced single cylinder overhead- camshaft engine for production. Most motorcycles of the period still featured overhead valves operated by pushrods and while there was little to separate the ohv 98s and 125s from dozens of other Italian motorcycles available at the time, the overhead-camshaft 175 provided exceptional performance. The 175 Sport was first displayed at the end of 1956 and was followed shortly afterwards by the 175T with a slightly detuned engine. Although the aluminium overhead-camshaft engine was based on the Gran Sport, the crankcases were now die cast and the cylinder head were in one piece. The chassis too was based on the Gran Sport with a single down tube frame that utilized the engine as a stressed member. Setting the 175 Sport apart from other motorcycles in 1957 was the sculptured fuel tank. Designed to follow function it featured arm recesses to allow a crouched rider to hug the motorcycle while gripping the clip-on handle bars. There were even eyelets in the tank to secure a chin pad for racers who really wanted to get their head down. There were detail changes to the 175 Sport and 175T over the next few years, in 1958 the 175 Sport received a dual silencer and also a revised carburettor and from 1959 there was a tuning kit available with a larger carburettor and a racing cam shaft. These kits were fitted by the supplying dealers and the motorcycles became the 175 Super Sport.

This beautiful Ducati 175 Super Sport was import to the United Kingdom from Italy in 1997 for the vendor to prepare and anticipate in the Motogiro D'Italia Road Rally around Italy, which he completed. It has been the subject to a recent, two year, ground-up restoration and has not been used since. Finished in the factory colours of bronze and red, the Ducati is being sold with a V5C registration document, a new MoT test certificate and a history file containing a number of old MoT test certificates. Here is a rare opportunity to own an iconic Italian motorcycle.

http://www.historics.co.uk/buying/on...per-sport.aspx
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  #2  
Old 29-Sep-2011, 12:00 PM
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DSC Member ChrisBushell ChrisBushell is offline
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Paul,

I had already seen the 175 and the description lets say has a couple of real howlers in it! Price is very ambitious!

The SC is a wide case bike, not a narrow case one. Wide case not available before end of 1968 - so good chance it is a fake. World expert on these is on holiday for the next couple of weeks, but back before the auction.

I get the feeling that this auction may contain more than a few wronguns.

Chris
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